A hundred years young… almost!


Originally posted on The Goa Review of Books:

cover-rotti

The young Jesuit Kelwin Monteiro promptly agreed and shared a copy of the latest issue of Dor Mhoineachi Rotti. It is now online and free to access here.

Kelwin wrote:

As assured, kindly find attached to this mail the January issue of the Dor Mhoineachi Rotti.  Feel free to put it on any website or  blog, so that it reaches to the maximum number of people!  I will send you the issues every month! This is the 99th year of its publication.  The year 2015-16 would be the Centenary Year of publication!

Great going… The magazine is in Romi Konkani (or, as sometimes interestingly called, Amchi Bhaas).  It is priced at Rs 10 per issue, Rs 100 for a year’s subscription, and Rs 500 via airmail to any overseas address.

You can contact its editorial office at the Thomas Stephens Konknni Kendr, BB Borkar Road, Alto…

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Rare, antiquarian, second-hand, and “loanable” Goa books


Originally posted on The Goa Review of Books:

Do you have any Goa books falling in the above categories that you might be willing to share and/or sell with other Goa Book Club members?
If so, please list them. I have quite a few Goa-related book which can be referred to at my home (or borrowed, if duplicates are available). The single-copies of these books I’m reluctant to share for obvious purposes. Older Goa books tend to be hard to find and, often, impossible to replace.

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Translations, typesetting… Konkani


Originally posted on The Goa Review of Books:

Just to put you in touch with a young lady (who did her graduation in Konkani and is now doing her Master’s in History), who’s open to doing translations (English-Konkani) and also typesetting in Devanagari:neelamtatkar499 at gmail.com
Neelam, feel free to join the Goa Book Club. There are authors here who might need translation services. It could also whet your appetite for books related to Goa.
ADDENDA: Anwesha Singbal write:
Hi. even i would be interested in translation jobs. I have been already empanelled on the government list too. Thanks. Email: asingbal@gmail.com. Contact: 9923442746
Sunetra Jog (sunetrajog at gmail com) adds: Hi Rico, Even I am interested in translations from English to Konkani or Marathi and Devnagari typesetting also.

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The Wikipedia… Making it Happen in Konkani


Konkani Wikipedia, in incubation

As you might be aware, the Dalgado Konkani Akademi and the Centre for Internet and Society Access to Knowledge Programme (Bangalore) are jointly organising a two-day Konkani Wikipedia Workshop to promote Romi Konkani in cyberspace, and on the Wikipedia in particular.

The workshop will be held on November 16/17, 2013 at the Krishnadas Shama Central Library, Pato, Panjim. But even if you’re far from Goa, you can help take this initiative forward.
What you can do to help:
  • Get in touch, pick up suitable articles to translate into Romi Konkani.
  • Work to locate sharable articles suitable for Romi readers.
  • Share your photographs via the Wikipedia, that can feed into this effort.
  • Edit articles in Romi Konkani, if you have the skills here.
  • Encourage others to contribute and share their skills and knowledge.
  • Pass the word around specially in colleges and among students.
To participate in the workshop, contact Jose Salvador Fernandes, Secretary of the Dalgado Konkani Akademi 9881810832 or dkakademi@gmail.com
If you cannot make it to Goa or cannot join the workshop, but would like to volunteer from afar, contact me (FN, SMS 91-9822122436 or fn@goa-india.org ) and we’ll see how best we can match your skills with the needs.
It’s also possible to contribute to the Wikipedia in other languages and scripts. Build knowledge and make it happen…

Makeover in a village hamlet — passion provides the punch


MUDDAVADDI, Saligao: From a demure salwar-khamiz to a gym suit in one minute. That’s the time taken for the transformation of Kanika, a young lady who entered a newly-renovated first storey in this residential hamlet of narrow lanes on a Tuesday afternoon.

In one monsoon, meanwhile, Ramesh Ghadi has converted a significant part of the mind-set of his village of Saligao (Goa) into a surprisingly fitness-conscious one.

Ghadi returned after 16 years from the Gulf, and spent some time managing health-clubs in five-starred deluxe hotels back in Goa. But, quickly enough, he shed the security of a job in favour of launching out on his own dream.

Late in the Summer 2013 he launched Ghadi Fitness, at Muddavaddi, tucked a little distance off the CHOGM Road. Now, he already has over two hundred persons on his rolls, and with his cool approach takes the message of staying fit to the average middle-class Goan village.

His diversity bulges like his muscle. A Konkani poet himself, Ramesh has staged Konkani plays in the locality temple. His story is typical of the Goan youth with much talent, hidden and waiting for long to be tapped.

On the Saligao-Net group on Facebook [http://www.facebook.com/groups/saligaonet] he’s also known for charming posts about the Goa of the 1970s that he grew up in, often accompanied by a photo clicked on his mobile phone’s camera. He describes the humble folk in a charming style through the simple ways of his writings.

But ‘passion’ is a concept that Ramesh repeatedly talks about. And believes in.

He builds his gym with this emotion; and how! Not just does he attract young men with bulging biceps, but he has lured many first-timers from Saligao and its neighbourhood to think of keeping fit by sweating it out four or more times a week.

From all signs, they’re taking to it with enthusiasm.

“We do hear noise from the gym,” says Ramesh’s wife Anushka with a smile, herself in a black track suit, but seemingly enjoying the near-celebrity status her hubby has gained in his locality with his unusual approach. The gym is a floor about their traditional home, done up with earnings from the overseas stints of Ramesh and his brother Digambar (Diga).

Once you’re in, you get the idea that this is not just about any gym. It a village club. Together with his personal training, Ramesh offers personal talk. If he sees a journalist in you, the focus will go on interesting aspects of a Goa which don’t get written about.

The village sarpanch (council chief) joins in exercises here on some days. So do others whom one might not link with being fitness freaks. You can meet your schoolmate Mark, whom you didn’t spot in decades, and some mums sneak off to don their gym shoes after the kiddies pack off for school.

Don’t be surprised to see Facebook posts of the 50-something Ramesh, telling you what one gymmie has just achieved in the field of fashion. “Everyone says our police are unfit. Meet Manoj,” he says, pointing to a muscular cop who comes to work-out with Sandeep and Suwanand, who are also policemen by day. Or night, depending on their shift, I guess.

Ramesh has the gift of the written word too. He told me, in his soft-spoken and quiet manner, of an essay he wrote in the village school, Mater Dei, that a generation ago struck his teachers as unusual and outstanding even then. He’s still a man with a hundred-and-one stories to narrate. From local lore, to focussing on the village footballers of the 1970s, and even ghost stories from Saligao, he can tell it all.

But there’s a story behind the Ramesh Ghadis of Saligao too.

In the 1970s, a retired Army employee from South India — whom everyone called “Joseph Sir” — settled in Saligao with his family. He then set up a rudimentary village gym, with the rough and ready equipment available in those days of scarcity. As a result, at least four to five village boys gained life-long careers from that initiative — often working at top health clubs and as swimming coaches in the Gulf.

Today, many of them are back home. Contributing to their village in their own unique ways.

Ramesh was himself at the Ramada’s there. “I know enough Arabic to discuss gym topics,” he says with a smile.

It’s not that Saligao didn’t have a gym earlier; but that was seen as meant for more hard-core training for serious-minded young men. Now you see people in their “sweet sixties” (Ramesh’s term) to young women coming in after work. The former to stay fit, some of the latter to gain weight!

Ramesh says of his long stint in the Gulf. “Once, when visiting home for the Ganesh festival, I looked around at the village pond (the site where the festival ending culminates) and realised I didn’t recognise 60% of the people present. That was when I decided it was time to come home,” he says.

“With my writing in cyberspace, people now know I’m not just a toughie with muscle,” Ramesh told me recently. But then, you can’t blame those who meet him for noticing the bulge on his arms, chest and more at first glance!

###

Location: Muddavaddi, Behind St. Anne’s Chapel.
Phone : 9850450055
Timings : 6 am to 10 am. 4 pm to 10 pm.
Charges : Rs 1000 for entry. Rs 500 per month.

Understanding Indian diaspora’s complexities


Understanding Indian diaspora’s complexities

IANS Sep 17, 2013, 12.00AM IST
(Understanding Indian diaspora’s…)

Book: Indian Diaspora and Transnationalism
Editors:
Ajaya Kumar Sahoo, Michiel Baas, Thomas Faist
Publisher: Rawat Publications, Jaipur rawatbooks.com
Pages: 442+xiv
Price: Rs.1,150

Like the parable of the Elephant of Hindoosthan, the Indian diaspora is indeed a strange animal; difficult to map, complex to comprehend and wide in its scale. “Migrants,” says this book, “no longer simply cross borders to live elsewhere but regularly turn this ‘crossing borders’ into a lifestyle of its own”.”

“Indian Diaspora and Transnationalism” sets out to “present not only an important overview of the state of the study on Indian transnationalism but also act as an important source of inspiration to think beyond the concept and the way it has been studied so far”.

Seventeen essays, three editors, and over 400 pages go into this effort. The range of approaches and diverse themes chosen make this an easy and fairly interesting read, even for one not directly connected with the subject itself. Some essays have been compiled from other sources, as the acknowledgements page makes clear, but the choice is interesting nonetheless.

Early on in the hard-bound volume, its three editors raise issues of “theoretical developments and practical implications” of Indian transnationalism. They point out that, with over 25 million people, India’s “is now one of the largest diasporas in the world”. Continue reading

Backstage Battles… and the Sometimes Harsh Realities of Goa


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By Frederick Noronha

P1180986

In the midst of the monsoons, when Goa’s fair-weather friends and tourists have quite deserted the place, collegians and other youngsters reclaim the dance-floor. If you’re past a certain age, you might have never ever heard of this event, but in fact the Battle of the Bands has going great guns for the better part of the last decade.

The duo behind this event are artist-designer Bina Nayak (now based in Mumbai) and Keith Fernandes (an ex-Bombay Goan, now based squarely in Goa).

AUGUST 15

Each year, on August 15, convenient because of the national holiday, the day-long Battle of the Bands draws hundreds of young people, from Bardez and beyond. It is usually held in the Parra-Arpora area. Its aim? “To get back the lost glory of live music. To fight to be heard amongst all the DJs!” explains Bina Nayak.

In 2003, Keith Fernandes came up with the idea of the Battle of the Bands (BTB, for short) because there were then hardly any live music shows, especially in the Rock music space in Goa.

But at that time there were plenty of DJ shows happening in Goa and elsewhere. Like, for instance, the War of the DJs, which was huge then. The Battle of The Bands aimed to give a similar push to Rock bands, its founders suggest.

At that time, there was also a Rock band competition in the open air auditorium at the Kala Academy, which somehow had stopped in the 1990s. Incidentally, that was a college band competition and Keith and his group had even won it one year. Also, the popular entertainment-music space called the Haystack in Arpora (run by the late musician August Braganza of Mapusa), had been discontinued somewhere around that time.

Being a musician himself and the son of a Jazz musician, Keith felt the need to “do something” for the Live music scene. Things fell in place.

BEST BANDS

The Bands rocked the event from 2003 to 2006. “We got the best bands from Goa, Pune, Bangalore and even Mumbai. Bands like Infra Red and Mogh. But [over time] the quality seems to be deteriorating. We started getting DJs and dance groups from the first show itself. They wanted to play for free during the breaks or while the bands got ready. We never turn away talent. But once these guys got a foot in — they just got better and better!” says Keith. Continue reading

Good gosh!


This is embarassing! I’ve not made a post here for months, and Goa Streets calls this one of the ten best in Goa.

Fredericknoronha.wordpress.com

One of the first journalists to exploit the power of the Internet, Frederick Noronha blogs about Goa and books, and issues that concern both. The books that he publishes under Goa 1556 are profiled here, along with vintage Goa photos, videos of events in Goa, lists of useful links on Goa and loads of photos of everything under the Goan sun.

Frankly undeserved!

To be fair to myself though, I keep sharing content via cyberspace… but not in a proprietorial, visit-my-site/blog way. So you’ll find my tracks elsewhere, not necessarily organised in one place.

Gulf ahoy?


Was recently involved in starting a Facebook network (open to members only) of ex-Deccan Herald “alumni” and was surprised to note how many ex-colleagues from Bangalore too had landed in the Gulf. Goa could do better?

Anyway, here are some job links in…

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http://wp.me/s2xoNs-19

Was recently involved in starting a Facebook network (open to members only) of ex-Deccan Herald “alumni” and was surprised to note how many ex-colleagues from Bangalore too had landed in the Gulf. Goa could do better?

Anyway, here are some job links in…

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Navhind openings


Why be elsewhere when you can be the most important person everywhere?

Grow big with The Navhind Times. The newspaper that offers high prestige and good pay.

The Navhind Times. Serving Goa since 1963

You can join us as:

A senior/staff reporter or…

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ToI, Goa: Copy editor, senior correspondent, etc


Times of India, Goa in its edition dated Monday, Dec 27, 2010 advertises the openings  for the following staff:

* Copy Editor/Senior Copy Editor/Chief Copy Editor
2 to 8 years of experience
Code GCE

* Senior correspondent
2 to 8 years of experience
Code GRP

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A rich tapestry of history, clothing and passionate prose


Book Cover:  http://bit.ly/ModaGoa

A stunning collection of photographs and illustrations, interwoven with the stories of people and events that shaped Goa, this book documents, for the very first time, the unique history of Goan costume.

In this, his tribute to Goa, Wendell Rodricks studies the factors that shaped Goa’s distinct garment style. From Buddhist drapes that carried forward the elaborate style of later Hindu costume, to the fine brocade coats of the Muslim Tughlaq rulers; from the Portuguese invaders who had to improvise their traditional Renaissance dress to suit the hot Konkan climate to the Western-style dresses of the newly converted Goan Catholics, Goans are what they are today because of the many peoples and cultures that touched their land. It was inGoa that the first ever Indo-Western garments evolved.

Different faiths, tribes and foreign cultures coloured the Goan clothing heritage, creating a style that is a unique blend of international aesthetic and Indian emotion.

Wendell Rodricks places this history of Goan costume in the spotlight with an archive that has never been researched before. Through illustrations by European travellers, a wealth of photographs by Mark Sequeira and India’s finest fashion photographers, and access to the fine clothing and jewellery of Goans, Wendell Rodricks makes a debut as author to reveal a rich tapestry of history, clothing and passionate prose, taking the reader to the beauty and backwaters of India’s golden state.

As Sathya Saran says, ‘[This book brings together] all the years of being a casual writer of serious articles to a head, putting his discipline and knowledge, and his love of his craft and his region to good use, creating for posterity a document that generations of students and readers can find inspiration from.’

Wendell Rodricks has put the tiny Indian state of Goa firmly on the fashion map. Establishing his own label in 1990, he moved to his ancestral village in Goa in 1993, creating memorable collections each season, inspired by many emotions. Known as India’s guru of minimalism, he gave the country resort wear, minimalism and ecofriendly clothing before the words were coined. He has written for many periodicals and books, has lectured on world costume History for eight years, interned at museums in Lisbon and New York and has been researching the history of Goan costume for eleven years. This is his first book.

Goanet A-C-E!
Arts ~ Culture ~ Entertainment
www.goanet.org

Writing, for children…


Espi Mai is Stuck Again...

Espi Mai is Stuck Again...

THE PRINTED WORD | Frederick Noronha

Anita Pinto’s ‘Tales from Golden Goa’ was something I first came across when my now-teenage daughter Riza needed some reading material. Rather, material to-be-read-to. The fascination with which she lapped up the Goa-based stories was really heart-warming.

Anita Pinto

Anita Pinto

Our own generation grew up with a scarcity of books for children. We would badger mum to pick up the few available at Varsha’s, the bookstall in Panjim then run by the father of Waman and Santosh Bhate who currently tend to it. There was another near the Shakuntala fountain in Mapusa, that mostly disappointed us and said no new books had come in from Orient Longman (or the handful of other national publishers).

There was a greater chance to come across an Enid Blyton, or a Beano or Bunty comic from the UK, or even an Africa-oriented Lance Spearman (aka The Spear) comic.

Now things have changed. A little. Aren, the second child, enjoyed Anita’s writing as much. The writer is releasing her second book of specifically Goa-focussed short stories for children this weekend (Oct 22, Saturday) at 5 pm at the Kala Academy. While looking at that subject, one was wondering how many options children looking for local reading material actually have. Functions like these could be an excuse for taking stock and building links among those focussed on the important job of writing for children.

A quick (and incomplete) rummage through my book collection tells me that a few but determined set of individuals have been writing for children in Goa. Perhaps they do so even if there the channels for distributing more such writing is yet to be effectively built.

For instance there’s Anne de Braganca Cunha (Goan Whoopee, Goan Tales for Children, 1999 and The Greedy Monkey, Mosaic Books, New Delhi); Surekha Panandikar (The Bridge at Borim, National Book Trust, 1999), Odette Mascarenhas (the Alfie Alphonso series), the late Olivinho Gomes (Konkani Folk Tales, NBT, 2007) and ex-Tanzanite (if not mistaken) Dr Susheela S Fonseca (Touched by Love, a novel for youth, 2005).

There have been magazines too, like the Prashanti Talpankar-edited one in Konkani (Rajhauns ani Bhurghim) and the children’s section in BIMB, ‘The Bookworm’ magazine from the children’s-library-and-more initiative of the same name, another by Rinald D’Souza, now a Jesuit priest, and musician-ad guru Alex Braganza’s own mag for youth. I’ve not seen copies of these lately, except for The Bookworm but could be simply out of touch.

On posting a query to Twitter, I got a couple of crucial reminders: Merril Diniz @MerrilD pointed to (my long-time friend) Mario Coelho of Ponda, while Prof Ramrao Wagh @ramraowagh pointed to another old friend, Rajashree Bandodkar-Karapurkar who, as he rightly noted, writes for children and her focus is on popular science.

Last weekend, I ran into Vishnu Wagh, the prominent writer active in the Marathi-Konkani space, theatre and other fields. Among the names he mentioned were Gajanan Jog of Taleigao, Kumud Naik okf the Goa Konkani Akademi, Rajini Bhembre of Curchorem, Milan Talaulikar of Tonca, Prof Prakash Parienkar, Dilip Borkar’s Bimb journal, sections within the Sunaparant and Marathi Gomantak Hello magazine, and Chandrakant Rama Gawas of Keri-Sattari.

There are others too, who while they don’t write exclusive for children, do have some of their writing which could be suitable to young people. For instance, Vinayak Sadashiv Sukhthanker (see his Tales & Tellers of Goa, 1974), Rahul Alvares’ adventures with snakes and his adventures during a sabbatical year after school (‘Free From School’, 1999), Luis S R Vas (Modern Goan Short Stories, 1971). Eulalia Alvares is from Mangalore, whose grand-neice, if I do not get it wrong, bears the same name and similar interests and is based at Margao.

While all this might sound like a long list, the point is (i) writing for children in Goa is still hard to come by (ii) it is written in different languages and scripts, with few translations among these, only dividing the small local market further (iii) some initiatives and writers have stopped or ceased (iv) there isn’t much happening on a consistent basis.

One hopes more could be done to promote this field, badly needed to stimulate the imagination of our kids.

ENDS

The writer can be contacted on fn@goa-india.org or 2409490 or 9822122436. First published in The Gomantak Times, Goa.

Goa -Old Photos… the diaspora in Africa


See some age-old historic photos online at the Goa Old Photos group. http://bit.ly/ieNVmY

Via Flickr:
Dr. Euclid de Souza, vice-president of Goan Overseas Association, Joseph Anthony Zuzarte Murumbi, Foreign Minister, Kenya, Luis de AssisCorreia, Pio Gama Pinto MP Kenya and Rosario Gama Pinto at a Barclays Bank, Nairobi sundowner in 1964. Photo from the collection of Luis Assis Correia.

Goa sports links in cyberspace….


Kids football Saligao by you.

OFFICIAL

Sports Authority of Goa
http://tsag.org/?pg=visstat

FOOTBALL

Goa Football Association
http://www.goa-fa.com/

GFA-links
http://www.goa-fa.com/?q=node/5

Sporting Clube de Goa
http://www.sportingclubedegoa.com/

Salcaocar Sports Club
http://salgaocarsc.com/

Dempo Sports Club (Wikipedia)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dempo_SC

Churchill Brothers
http://www.churchill-brothers.com/main.php

Sesa Goa Football Academy
http://www.sesagoa.com/aboutscdf.htm#football

CRICKET

Goa Cricket Association
http://goacricketassociation.com/

CHESS

Goa State Chess Association
http://goachess.com/

Goan chess blog
http://goanchess.blogspot.com/

BODYBUILDING

Goa Body Building and Fitness Association (Facebook)
http://www.facebook.com/pages/GOA-BODY-BUILDING-FITNESS-ASSOCIATION/95798352958?v=info

CYCLING

Goa Cycle Club
http://www.cyclists.in/group/goacycleclub

Goa Cycles: Rides, advocacy and more with the Goa Cycle Club
http://goacycles.wordpress.com/

BADMINTON

Goa’s ‘Professional Badminton League’
http://www.facebook.com/notes/sandeep-heble/goas-professional-badminton-league/181738157211

TREKKING

YHAI National Trekking Expedition GOA
http://yhaindia.org/files/adv_programs/description/Goatrekking.htm

WATERSPORTS

National Institute of Watersports-Goa
http://niws.nic.in/

Barracuda Diving India
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/barracuda-diving/

Goa water sports link
http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/goa-and-dona-paula-sports-club-offer-variety-watersports

Goa sports fishing
http://www.goa-sportsfishing.com/

Ask Laila on sports in Goa
http://www.asklaila.com/article/Goa/Get+Sporty:+Sports+Centres+in+Goa/79925/

DIASPORA

Doha Goans Sports Club
http://www.goa-world.com/goa/org/doha.htm

Manchester United Fan Club || Goa
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=41510756767&ref=search&sid=502514643.2468033804..1

CAMPUS

SPREE-National sports festival of BITS-Pilani, Goa campus
http://www.bits-spree.org/

LISTINGS, MISCELLANEOUS

Goa sports links on JustDial
http://search.justdial.com/srch/search_cwa.php

Sport Goans blog
http://sportygoans.blogspot.com/

GoGoa: Water Sports and Diving
http://www.gogoa.com/diving-goa.html#Water-Sports-&-Diving-In-Goa

Goanet Sports
http://lists.goanet.org/listinfo.cgi/goanet-sports-goanet.org

Goa Futsal League
http://www.facebook.com/search/?init=quick&q=goa
football#/group.php?gid=77168647415&ref=search&sid=502514643.2468033804..1

Sports of Goa-Indfy
http://www.indfy.com/goa-india/sports.html

This is incomplete, work in progress. Kindly send me any more links of interest related to sports in Goa. Thanks!

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POP — the Panjim Open Philharmonic


It’s no big name, but this is a bold experiment. It’s open, and it’s in Panjim (the tiny capital of Goa, India). Anyone can join in. All you need is an instrument, and the ability to read music. Rui Lobo, an IIT-ian whose main trade would have been hardware design, is the conductor, and it’s a baby nurtured by him and Rocky Lazarus. Very innovative!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YIu0eWXGFA

And a whole set of photographs here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fn-goa/sets/72157622726357296/

Goa, shrines, photography and controversy


There is still scope for discussion about what should be the rules for photography within a religious shrine, and outside a religious shrine (but within its property). I can understand the ire of those who feel they are being reduced to a spectacle when their intention might be to run a house for prayer.

Besides, there can be a far detailed discussion on principles of photographing persons, as I realised while searching for some other views on this subject.

Centre for Media Literacy has this page “Photo Ethics: Aim High When You Shoot” which raises issues about how people should be treated on camera. (In Rajan Parrikar’s original post, the issue was not people, but since JoeGoaUK raises it…)

Some pointers which struck me as worth considering:

* [W]hen photographing people do not treat them as if they were things.
* Do not take people’s pictures, give images, especially to the imageless.
* Never depict people as useless or inadequate. It is their helplessness which has to be shown.
* Do not invade anybody’s privacy except when it is necessary for depicting certain social situations.
* Yet, boldly reach into personal life, bearing in mind that the photographs you take are your brothers’ and sisters.
* There is no need to prettify people and objects; they have their beauty, and a good photograph exudes beauty.
* Sensationalism diverts attention from the essential.
* Shun extra long lenses. A short lens draws you near your subject.
* Try to establish a rapport with the person you photograph.
* Your social concern is to document life with empathy.
* Be true to the image people want to have of themselves, but at the same time do show what you believe is their real image. The dignity of the poor, in particular, demands that their situation be known.
* A documentary coverage can never be total. Complete a biased image by another biased image.
* Be an iconoclast – a destroyer of established images.
* Photos should not be used to exploit the persons portrayed.
* Ethical documentary photography is not your sole responsibility. But your photographs encourage certain responses in the viewer.

http://www.medialit.org/reading_room/article141.html

We can agree to disagree, but all I’m saying is that the issues involved as not as simple as they first seem.

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Remembering yesterday’s Goa… via Benaulim


PHOTOFEATURE :: By Frederick Noronha

Victor Hugo Gomes had been bugging me to visit Benaulim, and, as usual, I kept postponing. A man of few words (except when he’s writing detailed articles on themes like Goan music!), he just kept telling me, “You come and see for yourself.”

Finally, we did make it there.

His collection was the most amazing set of objects of the Goa of the yesteryears that I’ve seen at one place. That this artist and former curator of the Museum of Christian Art had done it all by himself, no state funding, and in his own home (with support of his lecturer-wife Alie, short for Aldina) is
all the more creditworthy.

In his collection, you can unwrap the story of Goa’s agriculture, cullinary practices and more. There are pots of every shape and size from yesterday’s Goa. There are spoons, and other kitchen utensils. Another collection deals with agricultural implements, and the technology — however simple, it was effective and sustainable — of the Goa of the past.

On Monday evening, November 2, 2009, Mario Miranda inaugurates the Goa Chitra museum, as Gomes calls it. As we forget what life was in yesterday’s Goa, this venture is a powerful reminder of a simple people, living simple sustainble lives. In a manner that probably made us more
contented than we are today.


Pots in their rich diversity:


The artist behind it all: Victor Hugo Gomes


Kitchen technology: simple but eco-friendly, human-driven grinders


A torture chair from the past? Note the spaces to tie hands and feet.


Goan tools, in diverse shapes and sizes


Can you guess what each is used for?


Measures and agri implements, from another day.


The artist’s home


Soda water bottles. Remember?

Beer, from Madras.

Windows 1950s


Baskets

The cutter’s arm


Ladles, of wood

Benaulim, where the museum is set

The artist's home, Benaulim by you.

Scenic setting for such a succinct story.

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Dr Bernadette Gomes… sociologist, artist


ONE KNEW BERNIE as a committed student activist in our college days. Later, I encountered her new avatar as Dr. Bernadette Gomes, sociologist, whose work and potential has been rated high by the likes of the US-based (Marblehead, MA) anthropologist Dr Robert (Bob) S. Newman. More recently, I got to know her as someone whose writing really deserves to be published (but that’s taking time to happen).

After hearing her mention it for long, last week I got to know the artist in Bernie.


Her exhibition ‘Maadani — Under the Coconut Palms’ is to go up on display in Panjim’s Institute Menezes Braganza on October 29, 30 and 31 (9 am to 7 pm). It’s subtitled, “Growing up in Goa, rendered in paint by Bernadette Gomes”.

In fact, her paintings strike one as a two-dimensional, sociological statement in four-colours (to use a printing term). This, she says, is her childhood recollection. But it’s definitely not the self-obsessed perspective of middle-class and affluent Goa, made up largely of a nostalgic yearning of the past or the mirages and promises of the uncertain future.

Her work instead tells the story focussing on subaltern Goa (and that’s where the activist embers come alive). It remids us of the traditional occupations and lifestyles which are now under severe threat (as capitalism and consumerism overrun a semi-feudal society with unbridled speed and determination).

She describes her paintings thus:

Each of them is a personal experience brought to life. It’s the way in which Goa’s folk life has touched mine, shaping me as I grew up.

The paintings capture people’s practices; a way of life that’s fast disappearing. Like the gathering of dried leaves before the monsoon, to light kitchen fires. Like par-boiling paddy at night. Women bathing at the village stream…

Others peep into little known aspects of Goa’s varied peoples. Like the Meazghor of the pastoral Gouly tribe, a living room-cum-kitchen-cum-store room, made entirely of woven cane. The men dancing the Powo during Dussehra. Or just taking a break as they tend the goats.

Fun, frolic and solemnity is portrayed in the Sotryo festival of Cuncolim; the fire walkers at the zatra of Goddess Lairayee at Sirgao; the village church feast…

My favourite, a lively scene of salt-pan workers, that could come from coastal Pernem, or any one of the villages in Bardez and Tiswadi that once made Goa a salt-exporting centre par excellence (now this traditional sector is facing immense pressure).

The details are amazing and, sometimes, like a picture clicked by one of those modern, high-res digital cameras, almost better than life!

Her images include:

      Goa under one umbrella — the sotryo festival of Cuncolim, celebrated by Hindus and Christians alike.
      Goulys get going — the Powo dance, a unique Gouly Dussehra custom.
      No fear of fire — the Dhonds of Goddess Lairayee walk on burning embers.
      Leav-ing nothing behind — gathering dry leaves for the fire before the monsoon in the zabblo (traditional coir-net bags).
                Salt of the earth — salt pans were once Goa’s principal industry.

Not for nothing does Bernie mention that she’s from Santo Estevao “also the native village of (noted Goan artist who rendered Christian themes in Indian style) Agnelo da Fonseca.”
She recently took premature retirement from her job at the Government Colleges where Bernie lectured in Sociology. But maybe the loss of students in Cuncolim and Quepem could be the gain of the local art scene. Enriched not just with lively colours but a deep understanding of the rich lives of the poor Goan who now gets turned invisible and often falls beyond the radar of urban Goa.

Sociologist, researcher, artist…


ONE KNEW BERNIE as a committed student activist in our college days. Later, I encountered her new avatar as Dr. Bernadette Gomes, sociologist, whose work and potential has been rated high by the likes of the US-based (Marblehead, MA) anthropologist Dr Robert (Bob) S. Newman. More recently, I got to know her as someone whose writing really deserves to be published (but that’s taking time to happen).

After hearing her mention it for long, last week I got to know the artist in Bernie.

Bernadette Gomes

Bernadette Gomes



Her exhibition ‘Maadani — Under the Coconut Palms’ is to go up on display in Panjim’s Institute Menezes Braganza on October 29, 30 and 31 (9 am to 7 pm). It’s subtitled, “Growing up in Goa, rendered in paint by Bernadette Gomes”.

In fact, her paintings strike one as a two-dimensional, sociological statement in four-colours (to use a printing term). This, she says, is her childhood recollection. But it’s definitely not the self-obsessed perspective of middle-class and affluent Goa, made up largely of a nostalgic yearning of the past or the mirages and promises of the uncertain future.

Her work instead tells the story focussing on subaltern Goa (and that’s where the activist embers come alive). It remids us of the traditional occupations and lifestyles which are now under severe threat (as capitalism and consumerism overrun a semi-feudal society with unbridled speed and determination).

She describes her paintings thus:

Each of them is a personal experience brought to life. It’s the way in which Goa’s folk life has touched mine, shaping me as I grew up. 

The paintings capture people’s practices; a way of life that’s fast disappearing. Like the gathering of dried leaves before the monsoon, to light kitchen fires. Like par-boiling paddy at night. Women bathing at the village stream… 

Others peep into little known aspects of Goa’s varied peoples. Like the Meazghor of the pastoral Gouly tribe, a living room-cum-kitchen-cum-store room, made entirely of woven cane. The men dancing the Powo during Dussehra. Or just taking a break as they tend the goats. 

Fun, frolic and solemnity is portrayed in the Sotryo festival of Cuncolim; the fire walkers at the zatra of Goddess Lairayee at Sirgao; the village church feast… 

Take a look at some of her paintings and decide for yourself:

My favourite, a lively scene of salt-pan workers, that could come from coastal Pernem, or any one of the villages in Bardez and Tiswadi that once made Goa a salt-exporting centre par excellence (now this traditional sector is facing immense pressure).

Art ... by Bernadette Gomes by you.

And here are two rich scenes from traditional Goa and its festivities…

Art ... by Bernadette Gomes by you.

Art ... by Bernadette Gomes by you.

The details are amazing and, sometimes, like a picture clicked by one of those modern, high-res digital cameras, almost better than life!

Her images include:

  • Goa under one umbrella — the sotryo festival of  Cuncolim, celebrated by Hindus and Christians alike.
  • Goulys get going — the Powo dance, a unique Gouly Dussehra custom.
  • No fear of fire — the Dhonds of Goddess Lairayee walk on burning embers.
  • Leav-ing nothing behind — gathering dry leaves for the fire before the monsoon in the zabblo (traditional coir-net bags).
  • Salt of the earth — salt pans were once Goa’s principal industry.

Not for nothing does Bernie mention that she’s from Santo Estevao “also the native village of (noted Goan artist who rendered Christian themes in Indian style) Agnelo da Fonseca.”

She recently took premature retirement from her job at the Government Colleges where Bernie lectured in Sociology. But maybe the loss of students in Cuncolim and Quepem could be the gain of the local art scene. Enriched not just with lively colours but a deep understanding of the rich lives of the poor Goan who now gets turned invisible and often falls beyond the radar of urban Goa.

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Artist and writer Silvia Braganza, widow of Aquino Braganza (a Goan who played a pioneering role in supporting the liberation struggle of Black Africa, and even dying on the plane crash that killed President Samora Machel) reads out her Portuguese poem, a tribute to the spirit of Barak Obama.


From the tiny riverside village of Pomburpa, along the Bardez (Goa) coast, Vamona Navelcar tells his story of his work and his art. He has been based in Mozambique, Portugal and Goa, and has held individual exhibitions in Lisbon, Mampula, London, Geneva, Lourenço Marques, Goa, Macau, among other places. His works are exhibited at museums, government offices and in private collections in India, Maputo, Beira, Quelimane, Nampula, Lisboã, Abrantes, Amação de Pera, Braga, Porto, Coimbra, Rio de Janeiro, Porta Alegre, Brasilia, London, Amsterdam, Brussels, Geneve, Stockholm, Macau, New Jersey, Helsinki, New Castle, Tokyo, Rijeka, Washington, Paris, Bonn, St John (Canada),Seoul, Sofia, Los Angeles, Barcelona, Cyprus and Madrid… Contact the artist at: Esvonta Building, Rua Bragança Pereira, Sta. Inez, 403001 Panjim Goa Phone +92-832-2995225